Site Logo

Woman meat market

Site Logo

By Laurie Penny. Some four decades after women in most Western countries gained complete legal and equality, our societies continue to cultivate a rigorous, stage-managed loathing for female flesh. We are bombarded every day with countless thousands of messages informing us that we do not look young enough, slim enough, white enough and willing enough, messages that come to us subtly and not so subtly, through film, television, advertising, print media and casual acquaintance, messages from which there is no reprieve. Corralled into rituals of consumption and self-discipline that sustain a bloated global market in beauty, diet, fashion and grooming products, three quarters of women in countries where food is plentiful go hungry every day in an effort to take up as little space as possible. Even if we do attain something close to the perfect physical control demanded of us, we are aware that our bodies are not our own: we are at constant risk of sexual violence and murder; one in five women in Britain and America is a victim of rape, and the rest of us learn to live in fear of rape.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: The Woman Meat Butcher in Hanoi Vietnam

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Women shop for prime cuts at meat market in Mizoram

Meat Market: Female Flesh Under Capitalism

Site Logo

By Laurie Penny. Some four decades after women in most Western countries gained complete legal and equality, our societies continue to cultivate a rigorous, stage-managed loathing for female flesh. We are bombarded every day with countless thousands of messages informing us that we do not look young enough, slim enough, white enough and willing enough, messages that come to us subtly and not so subtly, through film, television, advertising, print media and casual acquaintance, messages from which there is no reprieve.

Corralled into rituals of consumption and self-discipline that sustain a bloated global market in beauty, diet, fashion and grooming products, three quarters of women in countries where food is plentiful go hungry every day in an effort to take up as little space as possible.

Even if we do attain something close to the perfect physical control demanded of us, we are aware that our bodies are not our own: we are at constant risk of sexual violence and murder; one in five women in Britain and America is a victim of rape, and the rest of us learn to live in fear of rape. We are required to appear confident and sexually available at all times, but shamed and ostracised if we express arrogance, ambition or any sort of erotic desire.

Female flesh is a powerful resource. Even in societies where women now have equality on paper, it is still women who are obliged to produce, bear and raise children and perform the majority of domestic and caring tasks entirely for free, often on top of full-time paid work outside the home.

That women should have this much power cannot be borne; the threat of revolt is too great. If consumer society is to continue to exist in the manner to which it has become accustomed, it is essential that this latent power be appropriated, tamed and made docile. They are necessary fetters in a superstructure of oppression that has become so fundamental to the experience of femininity that it is effectively invisible.

This superstructure is vital to the very survival of the patriarchal capitalist machine. If all women on earth woke up tomorrow feeling truly positive and powerful in their own bodies, the economies of the globe would collapse overnight.

In four chapters, covering sexuality, eating disorders, gender capital and domestic labour, Meat Market sets out some of the parameters for the trade in female flesh as sexual and social capital, and demonstrates how women are alienated from their sexual bodies and required to purchase the fundamentals of their own gender.

In her criminally neglected The Dialectic of Sex, Shulamith Firestone identified this process as a campaign to alienate women from the means of reproduction. Expanding on the work of Marx and Engels, Firestone advocated a materialist view of history based on sex itself. It is just such a materialist vision of gender and society that Meat Market attempts to offer.

What could be more material, after all, than the body and the idea of the body? Meat Market does not waste time apologising for feminism or explaining why feminism remains a vital strand of thinking almost a century after women began to enfranchise themselves in the battle for the vote. Other books, essays and activist groups have already begun this work in the past five years, charting the emergence of a new generation of feminist agitators across the Western world and beyond.

In a spirit of respectful enquiry, Meat Market devotes space to examining some of the analytical stumbling blocks of contemporary feminist thought, including a certain poverty of materialist analysis that stifles action and closes down debate. Meat Market is not a complete survey, nor one that exists in a vacuum. Late capitalism quite literally brands the bodies of women.

It sears its seal painfully into our flesh, cauterising growth and sterilising dissent. Femininity itself has become a brand, a narrow and shrinking formula of commoditised identity which can be sold back to women who have become alienated from their own power as living, loving, labouring beings.

Upload Sign In Join. Home Books Society. Create a List. Download to App. Ratings: Rating: 3. Length: 88 pages 1 hour. Description Modern culture is obsessed with controlling women's bodies. Our societies are saturated with images of unreal, idealised female beauty whilst real female bodies and the women who inhabit them are alienated from their own personal and political potential. Under modern capitalism, women are both consumers and consumed: Meat Market offers strategies for resisting this gory cycle of consumption, exposing how the trade in female flesh extends into every part of women's political selfhood.

Interests in this Title. From the moment. Start your free 30 days. Page 1 of 1. Laurie Penny's arguments are fully realized in her later book, 'Unspeakable Things'. In this slimmer work she has some inconsistency that obscure the power of her voice.

For a quick shot in the arm it's a good read but I highly recommend her later work over this text. A book every woman and man should read. Brilliantly and passionately articulated.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions.

Meat Market: Female Flesh Under Capitalism is a book by British journalist, author and political activist Laurie Penny , which she describes as her "little anti-capitalist-feminist pop-theory book". The book is critical of 'the patriarchal capitalist machine', the sexualisation of women and gender stereotyping, and the capitalist economic system which entrenches discrimination towards women.

.

.

.

.

.

.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How To Eat Your Mate (HUNGRY BEAST)

.

.

The very well-developed urban goat-meat markets in Kenya may explain the exclusive preference for meat goats by f-h-r.com in Kenya had less interest in  Jemimah Njuki, ‎Elizabeth Waithanji, ‎Joyce Lyimo-Macha - - ‎Social Science.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Comments: 2
  1. Kazrami

    At you incorrect data

  2. Samusida

    This phrase is simply matchless :), it is pleasant to me)))

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.